The Greenwater Report for September 4, 2000

Greenwater Provincial Park - September 4, 2000 - By: Gerald Crawford
   

dreary
weather

Cool, dreary weather, with occasional brief rainfalls. We went to the Cove for coffee this (Sunday) morning, and they were doing a booming breakfast business. All the people out for the last weekend of the summer must have decided not to cook their bacon and eggs over an open fire.

 

 

drizzled

Harvesting didnít last too long. I got about four hours in on Monday, ten hours on Tuesday, but then it started to rain. It rained until about 11pm, but drizzled all night and until I left the next morning.

 

 

 

 

stray cat

I saw our stray cat at Grimsonís. It is now called Lucy (likely after Doreenís sister, Lucille, who was the one who made me get some food for the cat.) It looks fit and healthy, and just like when it was here, spends all its time sitting by the screen door, waiting to sneak in. It seems to have some kind of a peaceful co-existence agreement worked out with the rest of the animals in the yard.

 

 

Peggy Looby

Sincere condolences to Peggy Looby and family, on the loss of their husband, father and grandfather, Joe Looby.

 

 

 

 

 

Nick the
Barber

We went to Tisdale and Melfort on Wednesday. There werenít many combines at work - we saw two just getting started East of Tisdale, and two at work farther West . Nick the Barber says they didnít get any rain at all, but a heavy dew in the morning kept them from starting first thing. Here on the hill we had about a sixteenth Tuesday night.

 

 

Lorna
Hedman

We met Lorna Hedman in Melfort; she thinks itís a good thing I didnít get eaten by a bear - she thinks the bear would have had an awful case of indigestion! I donít know if she thinks Iím too tough to eat, or maybe that too much fat isn't good for bears.

 

 

pretty
harmless
stuff

Looks as if someone has been spraying the ditches under the three-phase line from the Archerwill Grid - at least, the shrubs have all turned yellow and brown in a strip generally under the line, and a little bit into Mike Karapitaís alfalfa field. Donít know what they use, but it doesnít seem to kill the grass, just the shrubs and trees. Must be pretty harmless stuff, too. Jim Steadman has seen them at work, and the man in the back with the spray nozzle doesnít wear any protective clothing or masks at all.

 

 

 

 

 

Kelliher Lorna and Melvin Bolton

On the road again.....! We went to Kelliher yesterday(Saturday), to a 50th anniversary celebration for Lorna and Melvin Bolton. At our table were Mr. & Mrs. Dick Barton, who are Lois Mattonās parents. Anyone from Kelvington, and anyone who had anything to do with the Elk Festival, will remember Lois and Bob Matton. Bob was United Church minister, and Lois was a management accountant. She did all the accounting for both Festivals, and was a truly wonderful person to work with. I asked Mr. & Mrs. Barton so say "Hi!" from us next time they talk to her.

 

 

Rose
Steadman

Also at the table were Mr. & Mrs. Lloyd Faure, who farmed between Kelliher and Jasmin. Lloyd said: "There was a Fedyk girl who was quite a painter," and I was able to tell him that indeed there was, her name now is Rose Steadman, and she lives about four miles from us. Rose tells me she rode on the school bus to Kelliher with one of Faureís children.

 

 

steady rain

















"No feeding" policy


When we went to Kelliher, we ran into a light rain around Elfros, getting gradually heavier until we got to Kelliher, when it was a good, steady rain. It rained all the time we were there, and all the way home again, without a let-up. When we got home, we found it had only started a couple of hours before, and there was a quarter inch in the gauge. Another quarter inch fell during the night, and a rain today brought it up to three quarters of an inch. As I write this, it looks as if it could bust loose with some more any time. We donít mind the rain here; we seldom water our plants, such as they are, and hope for rain to do it for us. Around Elfros, they likely arenít too unhappy about it either, as they were quite dry. As long as it quits and dries up, so harvesting can continue.

Our three-legged raccoon was back again last night. I suspect someone may have been accidentally dropping pieces of bread and apples on the deck, and she was cleaning them up. I may not have as much trouble making a "No feeding" policy stick as I did with the stray cat. People around here are aware of the damage a raccoon can do.
   

 

Did I see "September" at the top of this column? Can't be! Summer just started a couple of weeks ago!
  Gerald B. Crawford
Box 100, Chelan, SK S0E 0N0 (306) 278-3423
Check out my Webpage: http://www3.sk.sympatico.ca/crawg